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Researchers Identify New Genes Linked With Schizophrenia Risk in First-of-Its-Kind Study

Researchers have made an important discovery about the causes of schizophrenia, a disease related to dementia or fragmented mentality.   Researchers have identified two genes associated with the disease as well as a third gene that carries the risk of schizophrenia and autism. Scientists involved in this research believes, this discovery can go a long way in finding a cure for these kind of diseases. Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine found that these harmful genes are almost the same in every ethnic or racial group. The findings of this research were published in Nature Genetics . According to an estimate, about one percent of people worldwide suffering from schizophrenia. The scientists identified two risky genes, SRRM2 and AKAP11, based on a comparative analysis of gene sequencing from individuals with schizophrenia and healthy individuals. It compared a dataset of 35,828 patients with schizophrenia to 107,877 healthy or control groups and included a variety of

The Use of Energy for Physical and Mental Development Depends on Genes in Our Body

Perhaps you will be surprised sometimes by the fact that the same type of food is good for someone's health while someone looks weak. But now this mystery has been solved.

Researchers from the University of Helsinki reported that even minor genetic variation affects the use of energy from different nutrients. This research was published in the journal Nature Communications. Through this study, it has emerged that how nutrition plans based on genetic data can be designed for a healthy life in an individual.

An international team of researchers from Australia, Denmark and Finland has investigated that how people in the same population survive on different diets. For this study, the researchers used a genetic reference panel of about 200 fruit fly (Drosophila Melanogaster) strains.

These flies were given six types of diet, which was high in a mixture of protein, sugar, starch, coconut oil and fat. This analysis found that there was a difference in the use of energy derived from the use of these nutrients due to minor genetic differences in these flies.

University of Helsinki researcher and author of this study Essie Hawula says that we found unexpectedly that there was a lot of variation in the strains of these flies. The special thing is that even if their ability to survive was dependent on a high sugar diet, those flies ingested those foods from nature in which the concentration of sugar was very high.

The genes that regulate metabolism were preserved even during the mutation. This helped researchers to develop a better understanding about human metabolism. 

In the genetic analysis, the researchers identified several genes that play an important role in sugar digestion in flies. Most of these such genes are also found in humans. The linkage of the genome to obesity and type 2 diabetes has been proven in earlier studies.

The study of genes in bees is very fast and economical. "We have shown, among other things, that the tailless gene (TSX), which has previously been studied for its function and contribution to the development of the nervous system, is also important for the normal process of sugar metabolism" Hawula said.

The study also found that the JNK pathway, which plays an important role in stress signaling, also regulates sugar metabolism and storage fat synthesis on high sugar diets. This shows that the sugar present in the diet creates stress in the cells. This allows the JNK pathway to play an important role in how effectively flies process sugar.

According to the researchers, most of the findings of this research can be applied to human cases as well. However, more research studies are still needed for this. Hawula says this research emphasizes that the same type of nutritious diet may not be equally nutritious for everyone.

This research-based understanding explains how animal's metabolisms differ with respect to food. This means - it is not necessary that traditional food is equally suitable for all. This also shows that our understanding about healthy diet is still lacking.

He said that one option to deal with the situations arising out of such variation could be to ensure individual nutrition with the help of Neutrogenomics. He expressed hope that in future, on its basis, diabetes-II and other diseases related to metabolism can be treated with its help.

It will be economical as well as beneficial for long term health than any drug therapy. In the future, Neutrogenomics may also be used beyond traditional metabolic diseases. As is known about cancer cells, their metabolism also undergoes changes.

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